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Where did the term Galitziana come from? #general


Alan Tapper
 

Question to al,

I am very much aware of the differences between Litvaks and Galitzianas but my question really questions where and how did the term Galitziana come from?  I ask this because about 18 years ago I was touring In Northern Portugal and we decided to cross the border into Spain.  My wife at that tome spoke fluent Castllian Spanish.  The Provence in Spain just to the north of Portugal is called Galicia.  I wonder if many years ago it was the Sephardim who were referred to as Gslitianas because of the Provence.  By the way the people of Galicia have their own dialect as they do not speak Castilian Spanish either.  They had to bring a translator over who spoke Spanish as we know it so that we could order at a restaurant
Alan Tapper


rv Kaplan
 

Think it's just coincidence that there are 2 areas in Europe with similar names.  Galicia was Austrian Poland  in the past and the name would come from German, probably.  In Yiddish, our ancestors would have been Galitzianers.

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
TROPP, STORCH - Kolbuszowa, Cmolas - Galicia

On Tue, 4 Aug 2020 at 14:46, Alan Tapper via groups.jewishgen.org <sabaalan=ymail.com@...> wrote:
Question to al,

I am very much aware of the differences between Litvaks and Galitzianas but my question really questions where and how did the term Galitziana come from?  I ask this because about 18 years ago I was touring In Northern Portugal and we decided to cross the border into Spain.  My wife at that tome spoke fluent Castllian Spanish.  The Provence in Spain just to the north of Portugal is called Galicia.  I wonder if many years ago it was the Sephardim who were referred to as Gslitianas because of the Provence.  By the way the people of Galicia have their own dialect as they do not speak Castilian Spanish either.  They had to bring a translator over who spoke Spanish as we know it so that we could order at a restaurant
Alan Tapper


Daniel Bargman
 

IT's not a coincidence:  both places, spanish Galicia and polish Galitzia were inhabitated by Celtic tribes  in the past, with the root GAL as an  ethnic marker, see also: PortuGAL, Galia (latin for France), Gales (Spanish for Wales), Gaelic/ Irish language and so on


Daniel Bargman
 

You mean: 
 
-Galitzianer
-Spanish province of Galicia - in fact an authonomous region in Spain.
They speak a language (not a dialect): Gallego, mutually understandable with Castellano (Spanish), no need for a translator unless a foreigner has a partial knowledge of Spanish.
 
Nothing to do with Jews. Both places, Spanish Galicia and Polish Galitzia were inhabitated by Celtic tribes  in the past, with the root GAL as an  ethnic marker, see also: PortuGAL, Galia (latin for France), Gales (Spanish for Wales), Gaelic/ Irish language and so on.
 
Daniel Bargman
 


Harry Green
 

Maybe from the Romania town Galati which is located on the Danube River before it enters the Black Sea.
Harry Green


Reuven Mohr
 

wikipedia says that the name comes from the town of Halytsch on the river Dnjester


Malka
 

Genners,

 

What I recall from my childhood in Israel is –

A female from Galicia was referred to as Galiciana

A male from Galicia was referred to as Galicianer

Shalom, Malka cChosnek

 


Reuven Mohr
 

Galicia (Eastern Europe)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
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Galicia
Location Galicia in Europe.svg
Location of Galicia (green) in Europe (dark gray)
Map of the Kingdom of Galicia, 1914.jpg
Europe in 1328.png
Map of Europe in 1328

Galicia (/ɡəˈlɪʃ(i)ə/;[1] Ukrainian and RusynГаличинаHalyčynaPolishGalicjaCzech and SlovakHaličGermanGalizienHungarianGalícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/HalicsRomanianGaliția/HaliciRussianГалицияGalitsiyaYiddishגאַליציע‎ Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region between Central and Eastern Europe.[2][3][4] It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine. The area, named after the medieval city of Halych,[5][6][7] was first mentioned in Hungarian historical chronicles in the year 1206 as Galiciæ.[8][9] In 1253 Prince Daniel of Galicia was crowned the King of Rus (LatinRex Rusiae) or King of Ruthenia following the Mongol invasion in Ruthenia (Kievan Rus). In 1352 the Kingdom of Poland annexed the Kingdom of Galicia and Volhynia as the Ruthenian Voivodeship (LatinPalatinatus Russiae).


Stephen Katz
 

The German name for Galicia is Galizien. Someone from Galizien is a Galizianer (male) Galizianerin (female). Daniel Bargman explains interestingly the linguistic root.
Stephen Katz
New York City


erikagottfried53@...
 

This is a question I've had forever, so thanks for posting it.

Re Gallego, I have a friend who grew up in Galicia, and learned from her that the language is mutually intelligible with Spanish, but more in the sense that if you speak Portuguese (which Gallego resembles closely--no surprise, since it borders Portugal) or Italian you can get the gist of it, and vice versa.  Also, people in Galicia didn't have much choice to learn Spanish. Growing up under Franco she and her friends were not permitted to speak Gallego in school; if they did, they were punished.  Tout ca change ...
--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


David P Cohen
 

I am grateful for Reuven Mor's detailed repsonse..   Despite the coincidence of names an Ashkenazi Jew (even with vague whispers of Sephardic forebeareers )know only of Galitzianers who lived in an area of Poland/Ukraine thjat had suffered most from 17th century Cossack cruelties.  


Kathrynbkj@...
 

My ex-husband’s mother’s family came from Galicia in Spain, my father’s father’s family came from Galicia in Austria! Franco actually was a Gallego! Gallegos wear tams and play instruments similar to bagpipes. My ex-husband told me there is a saying: “ Where there are Gallegos, there is trouble.”