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moderated Which name do I use to enter into my family tree program---the old Russian name or the USA name? #general #names

LouLocc
 

Regarding my grandmother, she was born around 1901 with name Sarah BOLDO but the surname changed to GOLDBERG  in the USA.   Which surname should I use in my family tree program on Ancestry?  Similarly, my grandfather was born with first name KALMEN but it changed to CARL in the USA.  Which name should I use for him?
Thanks for any insight,

Louis Loccisano   <loulocc@...>

Sally Bruckheimer
 

"
Similarly, my grandfather was born with first name KALMEN but it changed to CARL in the USA.  Which name should I use for him?
Thanks for any insight,"
 
Everybody has this problem, if they have immigrant ancestors. One of my ggrandfathers was born Baruch, in Amsterdam, Barnett in London, and Bernhard in NYC.
 
Any good genealogy program today has Aliases as an option you can use. So this ggrandfather is, in Legacy Family Tree, Bernhard Laguna, with aliases Barnett Lopes de Leaǒ Laguna, and Baruch Lopes de Leaǒ Laguna. Which is the 'primary' name and which is the alias is up to you - you can swap them, so it doesn't matter.
 
Online programs are more difficult. I don't know of any that has aliases, so I use, on Ancestry, "Bernhard Barnett Baruch" and "Lopes de Leaǒ Laguna", as Ancestry will look for all parts of a name.
 
Addionally, for you, you may want to use the proper Polish KAŁMAN, although I don't know if it matters.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ
 

Max Heffler
 

I lean towards the name they last used, typically on their gravestone. I list the others in “Also known as,” or Birth name,” or “Nickname” entries in my Brother’s Keeper software. The online software also have places for aliases.

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Sally Bruckheimer via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2020 11:57 AM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Which name do I use to enter into my family tree program---the old Russian name or the USA name? #names

Similarly, my grandfather was born with first name KALMEN but it changed to CARL in the USA.  Which name should I use for him?

Thanks for any insight,"


Everybody has this problem, if they have immigrant ancestors. One of my ggrandfathers was born Baruch, in Amsterdam, Barnett in London, and Bernhard in NYC.

 

Any good genealogy program today has Aliases as an option you can use. So this ggrandfather is, in Legacy Family Tree, Bernhard Laguna, with aliases Barnett Lopes de Leaǒ Laguna, and Baruch Lopes de Leaǒ Laguna. Which is the 'primary' name and which is the alias is up to you - you can swap them, so it doesn't matter.

 

Online programs are more difficult. I don't know of any that has aliases, so I use, on Ancestry, "Bernhard Barnett Baruch" and "Lopes de Leaǒ Laguna", as Ancestry will look for all parts of a name.

 

Addionally, for you, you may want to use the proper Polish KAŁMAN, although I don't know if it matters.

 

Sally Bruckheimer,   Princeton, NJ

Michael Herzlich
 

The question was asked about which name to use when there are more than one.  You can specify as many names as needed on Ancestry.  For Ancestry or Family Tree Maker- 
Just go to Facts - Add - "Name" or "Also Know As", as you prefer.  If Name choose which one is preferred.
 
Michael Herzlich,  Delray Beach, Florida USA

Laurie Sosna
 

Ancestry.com has the option to add an alternate name.
On the person's page, next to Facts is an Add button. Scroll down and select Name.
When you select Add Name, you can check "Preferred." Otherwise, the first name you entered is always the preferred name.
And you can add associated facts or sources.

Ancestry will  search for the preferred name.
Often, I will run a search for a person, then change or remove some elements of the search depending on the time period I am searching in.
Adding in too many names gives me a lot of false search results, for example:
[Hebrew name] Leah Devorah [American name] Lena [maiden name] Friedson [marriage 1] Yudelevitz [shortened to] Levitz [marriage 2] Reubin [marriage 3] Goldin)

Laurie Sosna,   San Francisco, CA    <lsmacgeek@...>

Jay Paul
 

The way that I have always handled it is by the generation to change their name. For the generation that changed their name from the old Russian name to the new U.S. name, I first put the new name down and then in parentheses I put the old Russian name. For the generation before that I would just put the old Russian name. For the generation after that I would just put the new name.      Just the way I handle it.

Jay Paul, PhD,   San Francisco CA 94117   <jaypaulphd@...>

Lin Herz
 

With ancestry they have “also known as” and you can put as many names as you want. Most of my relatives did not change their names but in Germany evidently were known by many names. One document will have one nickname, another another nickname and it’s hard to tell which name was the “real” one. I never know which name to list as their primary name, but I put all the others in “also known as.”

Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida

Cindy Zsenai
 

If the family arriving in the US used Kahn, but the family arriving in Israel used Kan, what name should I use?
 
Thank you.

Jeff Marx
 

When it comes to deciding which name to use in a family story (as opposed to a database), I use the most recent name they utilized, followed by their original name in parentheses:  Louis (Lippa) Schwartz.
--
Jeff Marx

sharon yampell
 

I would use whichever each branch uses….

 

I have numerous last names on my tree that various branches use different permutations….on the older generations , like those who never came to America, I use what was known as the original last name and then used whatever permutation each branch decided to use.

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ USA

GenealogicalGenie@...

 

From: Cindy Zsenai
Sent: Tuesday, May 19, 2020 6:00 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Which name do I use to enter into my family tree program---the old Russian name or the USA name? #names

 

If the family arriving in the US used Kahn, but the family arriving in Israel used Kan, what name should I use?

 

Thank you.

 

 

entin@...
 

If you are researching in a place (country) where your family currently resides or resided under their new name, use the new name. If you are researching their ancestry in an old country, use their original ancestral name. You won't find them there under their new (changed) name.
Jeffrey Entin

Sarah L Meyer
 

I have always used the new name and had a tag that said "Former surname".  You can also use the aka (also known as) field for that name - and there is no limit to the number of AKAs so you could also have one - or a tag- for their Hebrew/Yiddish/Jewish first name (and include the surname) so that it would be indexed properly.

--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com

Rochelle Gershenow
 

For people who emigrate and have changed their name from the old Russian name to a USA name I list the original name in parentheses and then the new name. If that person's children are born after the name change I list only the new name.  In some cases where members of the same family spell the new name differently I list it as they spell it, e.g., Marrin, Marin, Maron.

Rochelle Gershenow
Connecticut, USA

Shelley Mitchell
 

With Ancestry, I have found that by adding all versions of a name will yield greater hints. You’re giving the system more to work with. I start with the original name, space, first variation, space, second variation, ...
--
Shelley Mitchel . NYC. Shelley.Mitchell@...>

cheshire@...
 

One thing to keep is that the "old Russian name" was spelled using the Cyrillic and/or Hebrew alphabets.  Spellings in the Roman alphabet are transliterations of the original and there can be a number of different transliterations of the same original name. This is something I've run across in my own family that I've needed to consider in researching the genealogy.

Another issue is that, on arrival to the US, the Russian version of the name sometimes was changed to the German or English versions by the immigration authorities.  Again, I've run across this in my own genealogy.

philgoldsmith@...
 

My "standard" is to use the birth name (albeit transliterated from another alphabet) as the "preferred" name and the Americanized version as an AKA. Using Family Tree Maker, I always show/print both the Preferred Name and the AKA. BTW, to dispel a common misconception: Beginning with the Immigration Act of 1893, no names were ever changed by American immigration authorities at Ellis Island or elsewhere. In fact, the immigrants left the arrival station with no official paperwork at all. The only document (except for medical purposes) was the Passenger Manifest which was , which was prepared by the steamship line at the port of embarkation and delivered to US immigration officials upon arrival. To be sure, lots of immigrants changed their names, but only on their own.