Would people move from Kishinev to Akkerman while modifying last name? #bessarabia #ukraine


idithh@...
 

Hi,

A DNA match and I both have great-grandfathers from what we are told is Odessa.   As an Israeli, we pronounced the last name B^D- 
which in English is spelled BAD.  She is a generation older than me and her relative came to the US earlier and spelled it "Badt/Bardt" in the US.

I found both of great-grandfathers listed in Akkerman in the  late 1800s / early 1900s .

However, then I search their father's names in the database, I only get results  in Kishinev and with the last name spelled "BAND". 
I found a "Band family' from the 1840s  living in Kissinev with all the first names of our relatives (Her g-grandfather;s name, and g-g-grandfather, and my g-grandfathe;s name ) - so tempting!

I was hoping this was a transliteration - I then tried to look at grave pictures, but see that they spelled it "bet aleph nun daled", so really BAND and not probably not a transliteration.

I gathered that "BAD" means "cloth" in hebrew and "BAND" means band/group in Yiddish. 
My impression was that that Russian was spoken in Akkerman and Romanian was spoken in Kishinev.

Any insight or issues with what I found would be appreciated.

Idith Kisin
 idithh@...


Odeda Zlotnick
 

"Band" can also be related to things made of cloth.
Translated from German - it can be a ribbon.

--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


luc.radu@...
 

Re -- Languages -- Both cities were in Bessarabia, part of the Russian Empire. Jews spoke  Yiddish and the "cultured" segment  was Russophone. Romanian was the peasants language since the old Moldavian nobility also became Russophone.

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY


Yefim Kogan
 

Jews in Bessarabia moved to other places by many reasons:  1) Get a job or a better job;  2) Get married;  3) to get some privileges in other places.

I am working on Birth records for Town of Bendery in Bessarabia from 1909 - town  not far from Akkerman.  From 386 records,  I see 41 babies were born to a family (father) who was a Middle Class, registered in Kishinev.  Only 153 families were registered in Bendery.  Other families were from close by gubernias - Podolia, Kherson  but also a number of families registered in Volyn, Minsk, Mogilev, Kiev, Vilno, Lomzha, Sedlets, Warsaw and other gubernias.
My point is that Jews used to move a lot, and not only inside one gubernia, but from far away regions too.

As far as modifying surnames, we know that Jews had reasons for that too, like  to hide under other name from military conscription; also in smaller places (not Kishinev or Akkerman), if a Jewish family let say had 8 children, from that 5 sons...   small town may allow only 1-2 of these sons to  had families in that small place,  the others should move to other place.  That rule apply not to all places, and mostly to small shtetl.  Some decided to change their surnames because of that.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


Jules Levin
 

Middle class, and even upper class Jewish families established businesses in many places because only familial connections established trust before modern international banking.  In the 19th Century my greatgrandmother's originally Kovno family Bregovsky/Beregovsky had businesses in St. Petersburg, Helsingfors, Viipuri (Vyborg), Latvia, and England.  My branch traveled to the US "cabin class". 

Jules Levin, Los Angeles


On 5/9/22 8:40 AM, Yefim Kogan via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Jews in Bessarabia moved to other places by many reasons:  1) Get a job or a better job;  2) Get married;  3) to get some privileges in other places.

I am working on Birth records for Town of Bendery in Bessarabia from 1909 - town  not far from Akkerman.  From 386 records,  I see 41 babies were born to a family (father) who was a Middle Class, registered in Kishinev.  Only 153 families were registered in Bendery.  Other families were from close by gubernias - Podolia, Kherson  but also a number of families registered in Volyn, Minsk, Mogilev, Kiev, Vilno, Lomzha, Sedlets, Warsaw and other gubernias.
My point is that Jews used to move a lot, and not only inside one gubernia, but from far away regions too.

As far as modifying surnames, we know that Jews had reasons for that too, like  to hide under other name from military conscription; also in smaller places (not Kishinev or Akkerman), if a Jewish family let say had 8 children, from that 5 sons...   small town may allow only 1-2 of these sons to  had families in that small place,  the others should move to other place.  That rule apply not to all places, and mostly to small shtetl.  Some decided to change their surnames because of that.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


idithh@...
 

Based on the the discussion, I realized I forgot to mention that all these family records are listed as "middle class" and I know for a fact that my great-gradfather was also middle class (as he fled the Russian Revolution circa 1920).   I would guess that this is nothing too special for Jews in the region?

Idith Kisin


Alan Loew
 

The that were forced to live in the Russian controlled areas had long army demands for all sons but the oldest.
I have heard the commitment was for many years, perhaps 10-20 years of army service.
In many jewish settlements there would be three daughters with 4-8 sons.
Often if a daughter only had daughters, a sister would take a son from a sister to avoid the draft to the army.
So you can have 3 sons split to 3 different mothers, which resulted in the 3 brothers getting to use different last names.
So, in this case those 3 brothers with no additional name changes would never show up in any records as brothers!
This makes our family tree project very challenging and creates a pzle that is never fully completed.
A. Loew

--
alan loew


idithh@...
 

Thank you.  Your message reminds me -  I saw a weird record for my DNA relative - her great-grandfather, Anschel was listed as head of household with two younger brothers 11, and 2.  No father in sight.   The father , Abraham, was very alive at this time.  

Idith Kisin