Yiddish Language Instructions - Duolingo #yiddish


bobmalakoff@...
 

I don't know if this is appropriate or not but Duolingo has just offered a Yiddish Language course at www.duolingo.com 
I had been using it for learning other languages, but when the Yiddish course was released I had to try it.  The service is free with ads or there is a yearly subscription option.  Other than being a customer, my only connection with the company is they are located in Pittsburgh.
Bob Malakoff
Pittsburgh, PA


Elizabeth Jackson
 

I have been using the Yiddish language course and it works quite well and has been great fun.
Elizabeth Jackson


Deb(orah) Cohen Skolnik
 

I am also using the Duolingo app to learn Yiddish, to honor my grandparents and beyond.  

Grateful to have the opportunity.  A few glitches here and there, but it's a beta version.

Deb(orah) Cohen Skolnik
--
SEARCHING:  KISSIN/KISIN (Vitebsk),
LIFSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ/LIPSHITZ (Vitebsk, Belarus),
ZOLOTUSHKIN (Jahotyn/Yagotin, Poltava),
GARBARZ (Mordy, Ostrow/Ostrova), LANDE/LANDY/LONDIN/LUNDIN (Bialystok)


rroth@...
 

I have also started this course and am enjoying it.

If you want to try, I suggest you first learn the Yiddish (Hebrew) alphabet somewhere else, as the early lessons in Duolingo are a good drill for reviving your knowlege of it but not I think very good for learning the letters from scratch.  There are phone and computer flashcard apps that do this better.

Can someone who knows Yiddish say something about the speakers? I realize many accents are available and the whole Litvak/Galizianer thing plays into it, but some of the words do not sound like I expect. Official instructors elsewhere speak YIVO but real people on the street speak in other ways, similar to how the Spanish you hear in NYC does not sound like what you might hear in Madrid.

==========
Robert Roth
Kingston, NY
rroth@...


bobmalakoff@...
 

I did check out the alphabet lessons and I thought they were OK, but since I already knew it it is hard to tell.

It is definitely not the same accent that my mother spoke to her parents.  They came from Belarus.

Speaking of accents I remember growing up when I was learning a little Yiddish I asked my grandmother why it was die television rather than der or das (masculine, feminine and neuter articles).  She said in her Yiddish accent that she was speaking English "t h e television"!

Bob Malakoff
Pittsburgh, PA


Bernard Miller
 

Thanks for that useful piece of information. 

I have been using Duolingo over the past few months either to refresh, activate or learn and have found it useful (but sometimes very annoying) but I will certainly give the Yiddish a try.

I was looking for a Catalan course and they do one from Spanish (which I have now completed) and I would be interested in a Ladino course (uTalk do one). And I have used it to refresh my Portuguese and am hoping to revive my Hebrew with it.

Bernard Miller
London, England


Jeffrey Grossman
 

Here are links to a couple of explanations of the various accents/dialects used in the Duolingo course: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiZSQtfKo_I
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYLVqfiLDpM

Jeffrey Grossman 
Redmond WA

SEARCHING Horowitz/Gurevitch (Vitebsk)
Grossmann (Berlin)


Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

The people voicing the Yiddish sentences on Duolingo are speaking Yiddish with a Satmar [Hungarian] accent. It is definitely not the "standard" YIVO pronunciation nor the Yiddish that was spoken in Poland that I grew up hearing. It also is not the Yiddish accent that one would hear at the Workers' Circle [Arbeter Ring] or YIVO Yiddish classes. 

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
NYC


Deb(orah) Cohen Skolnik
 

The Forward sheds light on Robert Roth's question about which Yiddish accent was used, and why.  They also have interviews with the people who put the Yiddish course together, as well as a "Yiddish Word of the Day" series.

https://forward.com/yiddish/444999/learn-yiddish-with-the-forverts-word-of-the-day-videos/

I thoroughly enjoyed this.  But I agree, it's not quite the accent I remember.  My grandparents spoke the Polish Yiddish dialect.  The other grandparents were from Belarus, but I had far fewer encounters with them, and my grandfather was already dead by the time I had those encounters.

Deb(orah) Cohen Skolnik
now near Asheville, NC, originally from the DC metro area (DC, West Hyattsville MD, Silver Spring, MD)
--
SEARCHING:  KISSIN/KISIN (Vitebsk),
LIFSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ/LIPSHITZ (Vitebsk, Belarus),
ZOLOTUSHKIN (Jahotyn/Yagotin, Poltava),
GARBARZ (Mordy, Ostrow/Ostrova), LANDE/LANDY/LONDIN/LUNDIN (Bialystok)


Jorge Frankon
 

Many interesting and helpful for me your comment Gloria was.
I noted s "strange yiddish" from the one I learnt at home, as my
family comes from Zuromin, a sthetl east from Warsaw, in a Bund's
environment and couldn't realize wich Yiddish variation Duolingo's
was.
Best regards.
Jorge, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
--
Jorge M. Frankon
jorgefrankon@...
Buenos Aires, Argentina


bobmalakoff@...
 

I had been using Doulingo to study Chinese and Portuguese.  I have a working knowledge of Spanish.  Then I had to add Yiddish.  Now you made me think about the Catalan for Spanish speakers and possibly Portuguese for Spanish speakers.  If they did Ladino I would probably want to take that!  More people speak Ladino than Klingon or High Valyrian, and they already have courses for those languages.

Bob Malakoff
Pittsburgh, PA