Zuruckgefuhrtes Erstregister #germany #translation


viferra@outlook.com
 

I have come across a record for my family from Berlin in the 1911 Zuruckgefuhrtes Erstregister.  Can anyone describe to me what kind of registry this is?

Than you in advance!
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Vicky Furstenberg Ferraresi
Belmont, California, USA

searching:

FUERSTENBERG (Gdansk, Berlin, Shanghai), PROCHOWNIK (Bydgoszcz, Berlin, Shanghai), QUIATOWSKY (Berlin, Ujest/Ujazd)), BAUM (Gdansk), FREYSTADT (Berlin, Sweden), HEYMANN (Israel, Geneva), SCHULVALTER (Berlin, Brazil), SILBERSTEIN/SILVER (Gdansk, Chicago)


Joachim Mugdan
 

Vicky Furstenberg Ferraresi asked what a "Zurückgeführtes Erstregister" is.
In Germany, civil birth, marriage and death registers, which were introduced in 1876 (in Prussia already in October 1874), were kept in duplicate as long as they were hand-written or typed; today, electronic registers are used. The first copy is known as "Erstregister" (primary register) or "Hauptregister" (main register), the second as "Zweitregister" (secondary register) or "Nebenregister" (subsidiary register). In Berlin, there were numerous register offices, each of which recorded life cycle events in a particular district. (These districts changed from time to time. Today, they coincide with the twelve city districts known as "Bezirk".) While Berlin was divided (1945-1990), it was often the case that one copy was in West Berlin and the other in East Berlin. After the reunification in 1990, registers were returned to the register offices where they belonged. "Zurückgeführtes Erstregister" is such a returned register. Another expression you can come across is "Zum Erstregister erklärtes Zweitregister". That is a secondary register that was declared a primary register because the real primary register was lost. For genealogical purposes, only the distinction between "Erstregister" and "Zweitregister" (as the last word) is of interest. Only the "Erstregister" contains the original signatures of the informant (in birth and death registers) or of bride, groom and witnesses (in marriage registers), and marginal notes often appear only in the "Erstregister". If the database doesn't tell you which type of register you are looking at, the note "Die Übereinstimmung mit dem Hauptregister beglaubigt" at the bottom of the page tells you that it is a "Zweitregister".

--

Joachim Mugdan

Basel, Switzerland

JGFF Researcher 5749

 


Stephen Katz
 

To Joachim Mugdan's very helpful explanation, I would only add that these were registers of vital records kept by the relevant "Standesamt" -- essentially, registry office. So one would have to know whether the record in question was of birth, marriage, death, etc., although this would probably be clear from the record in question.

Stephen Katz